November 23, 2013 by
Category:

Let’s say we have to display SharePoint site collection size using PowerShell. We can easily use Client Object Model and PowerShell to accomplish that. Let’s do it step by step:

 

PS > $spsite = Get-SPSite “http://sharepoint:100”

PS > $spsite.Usage

It will display data like this:

size

Hmmm, interesting. It shows the size and also some other user information like visits and bandwidth. But, we just care for the size. So let’s modify the code:

PS > $spsite.Usage.Size

Now the output looks like this:

3514033

Ok, we have the size but it’s in bytes. Let’s convert that to MB.

PS > $spsite.Usage.Size / 1000000
or alternatively we can use this code:
PS > $spsite | select @{Name=”Size”; Expression={$_.Usage.Size / 1000000 }}

The output looks like this:

3.514033

Still doesn’t look good. Now we can use the expression formatting to make it human friendly:

PS > $spsite | select @{Name="Size"; Expression={"{0:N2} MB" -f ($_.Usage.Storage/1000000)}}

Bingo, now it shows up as:

3.51 MB

0:N2 is the standard .NET based format. 0 would means the argument position and N2 means number format with 2 decimal places. –f is used for pass the argument to the format.

One Comment

Comments are closed.