WebSphere Liberty Profile Webinar – Wednesday, May 28, 2PM Eastern

Although WebSphere Application Server is one of the most robust Java Enterprise Application Servers for deployment of mission critical applications, it is not always that easy to use in development. Often we see clients who deploy to WebSphere in production using Tomcat or some other server to test in development because it is "easier". The complaint is that the full WebSphere Application Server takes too long to start or redeploy applications and is not intuitive to configure for developers. To address these issues, IBM has created the WebSphere "Liberty Profile" server. This is a lightweight server, certified for Java EE 6, that starts much faster and is easier to configure.

 

In this webinar we will look at the features of the WebSphere Liberty Profile server, how it compares to the "full" WebSphere Application Server, and how you can use it to simplify the development and testing of Java EE applications. We will even show that with version 8.5.5 of the WebSphere Liberty Profile there are some intriguing new features that would even let you run the server as part of a cluster and use it for some production deployment scenarios. We will also highlight the use of FREE Eclipse development tools that are available since the cost of development tools for WebSphere Application Server has also been historically an issue.

Time for Spring …. 4!

On the first day of Spring 2014 (even though some of you may feel winter will never end) I think it is a good time to talk about what is going on with the Spring Java Framework.

Over the past year there have been some big things going on with Spring, probably the chief among them the move in April 2013 to place Spring under the control of the new company GoPivotal.  This spin-off from VMware, along with an investment from GE, is meant to support a new breed of applications where cloud and big data are a given not some afterthought on a platform not built for it.  With the ever-expanding broad ecosystem of Spring-related projects, in addition to the immense popularity of the core Spring Framework, Spring seems a natural fit as an application framework to support this.  Probably the most immediate change for those already using the Spring Framework day to day though was that there was a new web site to get Spring documentation, downloads, resources, etc:

http://spring.io/

Fast forward to the end of 2013 and we had the release of the Spring 4 Framework in December.  The release of Spring 4 fits nicely with the desire to support more modern applications as support for many new technologies has been added.  Among those are included support for Java EE 6 & 7, Java SE 8 (which was just released) and more recent versions of many optional third party libraries.  Spring 4 is also a new foundation for the expanding list of Spring-related projects, the following just a few key ones to mention now:

  • Spring Boot – Jumpstart on rapid development of Spring applications
  • Spring Data – An umbrella project with a number of useful utilities for popular data access technologies like MongoDB, Hadoop, and JPA
  • Spring XD – Unified system for big data ingestion, analytics, batch processing and export
  • Spring Security – Application security framework
  • Spring Mobile & Spring for Android – Support for developing mobile applications
  • Spring Integration – Implementation of well-known enterprise integration patterns
  • Spring Batch – Comprehensive batch application framework
  • and several more

As you start to look at the Spring 4 Framework and what it can do for you, we at Web Age Solutions would like to assist you in that discovery.  Below are some links to a webinar we will be giving next week on the changes in the Spring 4 release and a link to the new training category we have posted with Spring 4 training classes.

TRAINING CLASSES – Spring 4 Framework Training Classes

Here’s to hoping that your wait for using Spring 4 will not be as long as the wait for Spring 2014 has seemed!

Testing Cordova Hybrid Apps in Worklight

Recently I worked on a project that introduced me to IBM® Worklight® mobile application platform. Among other things, I was pleasantly surprised at the price tag of the Developer Edition of this product: it is free. The Developer Edition comes with an Eclipse-based IDE called the Worklight Studio which offers support for authoring the client-side of your mobile web, hybrid and native apps as well as developing server-side components called adapters.

The Worklight Studio comes with a web application called the Mobile Browser Simulator that can help you with developing and testing your hybrid applications created using Apache Cordova framework. The Mobile Browser Simulator offers you a suite of visual controls for simulating a variety of native bridge APIs to such native device capabilities as accelerometer, camera, compass, file system, device info, contacts database, etc., without the need to run your apps directly on mobile devices or their emulators (which would require setting up specific run-time environments, such as ADT Eclipse plug-in for Android, Xcode for iPhone, etc.)

Here is a screen-shot of the Mobile Browser Simulator that shows Cordova APIs’ visual controls/widgets on the left with the expanded Battery widget that helps simulate different battery levels and the battery plugged-in event (fired when the battery is plugged in for charging and stays in this state until un-plugged).
Worklight 6.0 Mobile Browser Simulator Screen

So, if you are interested in this approach to testing Cordova hybrid apps, below are a few simple steps to follow that will help you get up and running in no time.

Note: For this blog posting, I used Worklight ver. 6.0 which comes with Cordova framework ver. 2.6.
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